Trumpington Village Sign unveiled June 2010, designed by Sheila Betts.
Trumpington Local History Group
The Wilson Brothers and
Trumpington War Memorial
Copyright © Trumpington Local History Group, 2014. Updated 9 December 2014.
Web site email:
admin@trumpingtonlocalhistorygroup.org
Arthur Brookes

Whilst many Trumpington families suffered losses in World War I, the
Wilson family suffered more than most.

The family lived in Workhouse Yard (Whitlocks Yard). They had four
sons, three of whom were killed in the Great War, but only the youngest
son survived. The family also lost a son-in-law.

This is the story of the brothers.

For additional information, see:

Trumpington and World War I:
Introduction.
History of the War Memorial
1997 Leaflet
Mr Wilson senior worked as a shepherd and later as
a roadman. The family lived in Workhouse Yard,
Trumpington, more commonly known as Whitlocks
Yard. They had four sons, three of whom were
killed in World War I. The family also lost a
son-in-law (Albert Jeffries) in the War. Only the
youngest son survived.

Albert Charles Wilson
Albert Charles died at home of injuries on 4
November 1918, just a week before the Armistice.

Robert Wilson
Robert was a well known amateur cricketer and
considered to be one of the best bowlers in the
county. He was killed on the first day of the battle
of the Somme, which claimed 60,000 British
casualties of whom 20,000 were killed. The battle in
total cost 420,000 British lives and resulted in the
award of 51 Victoria Crosses, nine on day 1 of
which 6 were posthumously awarded. After 100
days of fighting the objective set for day 1 had not
been reached.

William Wilson
On leaving school, William took a job with a family
in Chaucer Road, gardening and driving the pony
and trap. When war was declared, William
immediately enlisted in the Cambridgeshire
Regiment but was later transferred to the
Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) in 1916 whilst serving
in France he was badly wounded in the hip. He was
brought home to spend time in hospital at
Cheltenham. While on sick leave, he married
Constance Fuller of Poplar End, Grantchester, on
27 January 1916. At the time of her marriage,
Constance was in service at Byron's Lodge; after
the wedding the two moved into Lodge Cottage at
the entrance to Manor Lodge. William's hip had
been so badly shattered, leaving him with one leg
shorter than the other, that they were certain he
would be able to leave the army. However, he was
called back to France. On 21 September 1918, the
5/6th Scottish Rifles were attacking an enemy post
at Villers-Guislain near Cambrai. In the attack, 14
men including William were killed.

Further information about the
Cameronians
(Scottish Rifles) and the regimental museum.
Grave of Private Albert Charles Wilson, Trumpington Churchyard, Shelford Road, Trumpington. Photo: Arthur Brookes, November 2009.
Commemoration of Private Robert Wilson, Suffolk Regiment, died 1 July 1916. Cambridge Independent Press, 8 September 1916, p. 6.
Commemoration of Private Robert
Wilson, Suffolk Regiment, died 1 July
1916.
Cambridge Independent Press, 8
September 1916, p. 6.
Grave of Private Albert Charles Wilson,
Trumpington Churchyard, Shelford Road,
Trumpington. Photo: Arthur Brookes,
November 2009.