Trumpington Village Sign unveiled June 2010, designed by Sheila Betts.
Trumpington Local History Group
Background to bird names on
Seven Acres
Copyright © Trumpington Local History Group, 2016. Updated 2 January 2016.
Email:
admin@trumpingtonlocalhistorygroup.org
Sign at the entrance to the
Seven Acres development.
Photo: Howard Slatter,
November 2015.
When the Local History Group and the Residents' Association proposed names as street names
in 2010-11, Howard Slatter recommended a set of bird names for the particular species that he
knew could be seen on the farmland which was due to turn into the new Clay Farm
development. The concern at that time was whether these species would still be seen after the
houses were built. We are very pleased that the developer of Seven Acres did adopt the names
and we are beginning to see how the bird species are faring. Howard has had a conversation with
a resident of one of these roads, in which she started to complain that these were just pretty
names dreamed up by the developer; he soon put her right.

Kingfisher Gardens is the road off Addenbrooke's Road into the Seven Acres development. This
was part of the first phase, with homes constructed in 2012-13 and occupied from late 2012.
Lapwing Avenue is the road going east (left) from Kingfisher Gardens, parallel with
Addenbrooke's Road. The first homes were constructed from 2012 and work continued to 2014,
with the homes occupied from mid 2014. Skylark Road is at the western end of the
development, off Kingfisher Gardens. Homes were constructed in 2012-13 and occupied from
2013. Partridge Close is located off Skylark Road, between Kingfisher Gardens and
Addenbrooke's Road. Homes were constructed in 2012-13 and occupied from 2013-14.
Seven Acres streets. Source: © OpenStreetMap contributors (Howard Slatter).
Howard Slatter gave a presentation about the origin of the names
'Kingfisher Gardens', 'Lapwing Avenue', 'Skylark Road' and 'Partridge
Close' at the Local History Group meeting on 12 November 2015. These
streets are named after birds which were common on the land prior to the
construction of Addenbrooke's Road and the Seven Acres housing
development.

There is a separate page with information about the
derivation of street
names.
Sign at the entrance to the Seven Acres development. Photo: Howard Slatter, November 2015.
We are fortunate in having a number of aerial photographs of the area, including one from 2002,
looking south, while the land was still farmed, and 2015, showing the Seven Acres area bottom
left and the large pond in the green space that will soon be the Clay Farm park. This balance
between housing, green spaces and a large pond has been an important factor for the bird species.
Kingfishers can be seen every winter on Hobson’s Brook, and occasionally in summer. Howard
Slatter has been recording the birds seen in this area since 1988 and in August 2001 he saw a
family party of 5 birds on the brook, which suggests that they may have bred here.
Kingfisher Gardens, Seven Acres. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 20 November 2015.
Kingfisher Gardens, Seven Acres. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 20 November 2015.
Kingfisher Gardens. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 20 November 2015.
The native grey partridge, as opposed to the introduced French or red-legged partridge, is one of
the species on the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) 'red list' of birds, having
undergone serious declines in its population during the last 30 years. In that time, Howard
certainly saw numbers on the farmland go down considerably, but since coming out of
agricultural production, their numbers have increased to levels well above those of 25 years ago.
The Clay Farm park is now one of the best places in the county to see these birds.
Partridge Close, Seven Acres. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 20 November 2015.
Partridge Close, Seven Acres. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 20 November 2015.
Partridge Close. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 20 November 2015.
The skylark tells a similar story. The park has a very healthy breeding population, despite
another tale of national decline, and being red-listed by the RSPB.
Street sign on Skylark Road, Seven Acres. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 20 November 2015.
The northern end of Skylark Road, Seven Acres. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 20 November 2015.
Street sign on Skylark Road. Photo: Andrew
Roberts, 20 November 2015.
The northern end of Skylark Road. Photo:
Andrew Roberts, 20 November 2015.
The skylark tells a similar story. The park has a very healthy breeding population, despite
another tale of national decline, and being red-listed by the RSPB.
And finally, the lapwing. A rather different story here, again amidst a picture of national decline.
When this area was farmed, there were large winter flocks of lapwing on and over the fields.
This graph shows the number Howard has recorded every month since 1988. In the 1990s, there
were winter flock sizes of up to 4000 birds, gradually declining until in the 2010-11 winter
Howard saw hardly any. But from summer 2011 onwards, once farming had stopped and the
pond was excavated, lapwings started breeding here for the first time in Howard's experience.
There have now been up to 5 pairs nesting round the pond every summer. Howard suspects that
once the park is fully open and the amount of human pressure increases accordingly, this number
will shrink, but one or two pairs should hold on.
Lapwing occurrence in Trumpington, 1988 to 2015. Source: Howard Slatter.
Lapwing occurrence in Trumpington, 1988 to
2015. Source: Howard Slatter.
Lapwing Avenue and Raeburn House, Seven Acres. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 11 April 2015.
Street signs at the junction of Lapwing Avenue and Kingfisher Gardens, Seven Acres. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 20 November 2015.
Lapwing Avenue and Raeburn House. Photo:
Andrew Roberts, 11 April 2015.
Street signs at the junction of Lapwing Avenue
and Kingfisher Gardens. Photo: Andrew
Roberts, 20 November 2015.
So all the street name birds are still here, and can, with a bit of luck, be seen from the housing
development.
Seven Acres streets. Source:  OpenStreetMap contributors (Howard Slatter).
Aerial photograph of Clay Farm from the south east, with Seven Acres lower left.
Countryside/Tamdown, 9 September 2015.
Aerial photograph of Clay Farm from the south east, with Seven Acres lower left. Countryside/Tamdown, 9 September 2015.
Aerial photograph of Clay Farm from the north, before the development of
Addenbrooke's Road and housing, with the main railway line to the left, Shelford
Road and the camp site upper right. Source: Howard Slatter.
Aerial photograph of Clay Farm from the north, before the development of Addenbrooke's Road and housing, with the main railway line to the left, Shelford Road and the camp site upper right. Source: Howard Slatter.