Trumpington Village Sign unveiled June 2010, designed by Sheila Betts.
Trumpington Local History Group
Trumpington Meadows street
names: Piper, Otter, Consort
Copyright © Trumpington Local History Group, 2015. Updated 30 December 2015.
Email:
admin@trumpingtonlocalhistorygroup.org
Street sign at the entrance
to Consort Avenue. Photo:
Andrew Roberts, 21
November 2015.
Stephen Brown began his talk by explaining that the Trumpington Meadows development is on
the site of the
Plant Breeding Institute (PBI), which he discussed in more detail in a talk in 2009.
The farmland was acquired in 1950, and the main office building was built in 1954 and formally
opened in 1955. The PBI had just over 400 acres here and hired land elsewhere. Under its
director, Dr G.D.H. Bell, it developed rapidly with a number of important crops and was
exporting seed world-wide. By 1984, it had nearly 400 staff. Up to 1976, the 'Maris' prefix was
used for binomial crop names (derived from the nearby
Maris Lane). Following a directive from
the then European Union, the prefix ‘Maris’ could not be used and subsequent varieties had a
single name. The applied plant breeding programmes were sold to Unilever in 1987, trading as
Plant Breeding International Cambridge (PBIC), and then to Monsanto, before eventually being
earmarked for housing development. Most of the basic research was transferred to the John
Innes Foundation.
Trumpington Meadows, including Piper Road, Otter Close and Consort Avenue
(the location of Otter Close to be confirmed). Source: ©
OpenStreetMap
contributors (Howard Slatter).
Stephen Brown gave a presentation about the origin of three of the street
names in the Trumpington Meadows development (Piper Road, Otter
Close and Consort Avenue) at the Local History Group meeting on 12
November 2015. These are named after crops which were developed on
site when the land was part of the Plant Breeding Institute (PBI) and
Plant Breeding International Cambridge (PBIC).

There is a separate page with information about the
derivation of street
names.
Street sign at the entrance to Consort Avenue, Trumpington Meadows. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 21 November 2015.
The front entrance to the Plant Breeding Institute headquarters building. Source: Plant Breeding Institute.
Demolition of the headquarters building, called the Maris Centre by Monsanto, March 2009. Photo: Stephen Brown.
The front entrance to the Plant Breeding Institute
headquarters building. Source: Plant Breeding
Institute.
Demolition of the headquarters building,
called the Maris Centre by Monsanto,
March 2009. Photo: Stephen Brown.
At this point, Stephen and others worked together to proposed a number of names as potential
street names for the Trumpington Meadows development, including names based on the former
field names and the crops produced at the site. These suggestions were endorsed by the City
Council and the District Council and have subsequently been used as street names by the
developers and councils.
Trumpington Meadows, including Piper Road, Otter Close and Consort Avenue (the location of Otter Close to be confirmed). Source:  OpenStreetMap contributors (Howard Slatter).
Piper Road is one of the longer roads within the development, running from Consort Avenue at
the northernmost end of the development, forming an inverted V with One Tree Road. The road
was constructed from 2014, with homes occupied from autumn 2014. Stephen said that the
Maris Piper potato was bred to be resistant to soil-born nematodes.
Piper Road, autumn 2015. Photo: Stephen Brown.
Piper Road, autumn 2015. Photo: Stephen Brown.
Piper Road, autumn 2015. Photo: Stephen Brown.
Maris Lane street sign at the High Street junction. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 6 December 2014.
Piper Road street sign at the Consort Avenue junction. Photo: Andrew Roberts, 6 December 2014.
Maris Lane and Piper Road street signs. Photo:
Andrew Roberts, 6 December 2014.
Otter Close is on the western edge of the development, constructed from 2015. Stephen said that
the name was derived from Maris Otter, a winter variety of malting barley, now used mainly be
artisan brewers. 2015 marked the 50th harvest of the variety.
Otter Close, autumn 2015. Photo: Stephen Brown.
Otter Close, autumn 2015. Photo: Stephen
Brown.
Consort Avenue is the main spine road in the northern part of the development, going from
Hauxton Road to the west. It was constructed from 2012, with homes occupied from 2013.
Stephen said that Consort wheat was developed by PBI and PBIC, and became a preferred
export wheat to Mediterranean countries after it was introduced in 1992, including being used in
Italian pizza. It is a soft milling wheat which has had an unusually long period of use in the UK
and is still grown for the Scottish distilling industry and for use by Jordans and Allisons.
Consort Avenue, autumn 2015. Photo: Stephen Brown.
Advertisement for Consort wheat. Source: Plant Breeding International Cambridge.
Consort Avenue, autumn 2015. Photo: Stephen
Brown.

Advertisement for
Consort wheat. Source: Plant
Breeding International Cambridge.