Trumpington Village Sign unveiled June 2010, designed by Sheila Betts.
Trumpington Local History Group
History of Trumpington Village
Hall: 1910s: World War I
Copyright © Trumpington Local History Group, 2009. Updated 12 May 2009
This is the third part of the history of Trumpington Village Hall. For an
introduction to the series, see
History of Trumpington Village Hall.
Continue with the next part of the history of Trumpington Village Hall.
Display panel about the history
of the Village Hall, Centenary
Exhibition, October 2008.
Photo: Stephen Brown.
Display panel about the history of the Village Hall, Centenary Exhibition, October 2008.
From its opening in 1908 to the start of World War I, the Village Hall was referred to as the
Men's Institute and the men made good use of the hall. Other groups continued to meet in the
school, the vicarage or people's homes. Big celebrations were held in barns on the farms. When
World War I broke out, the hall was commandeered for recruiting and training and does not
appear to have had any social significance. All eligible men were exhorted to "join Kitchener's
Army" and were told it was a duty and a privilege to serve their country. The plaque in the
Village Hall shows the huge response and the tragic losses.

After the war, the hall was no longer solely the men's domain. The Mothers' Union, The Girls
Friendly Society, The Women's Institute, and the Church AGM (followed by a social) took
place in the hall. The Dramatic Society performed and regular socials, dances and concerts were
held.

The records of the period 1914-1918 are poor. If you have any further information, we would
be pleased to hear from you.
The War Memorial in the Hall, dedicated to ‘Men of Trumpington who served in the Great War 1914-1918’.
The War Memorial in the Hall, dedicated to 'Men of Trumpington who
served in the Great War 1914-1918'. Photo: Stephen Brown.