Trumpington Village Sign unveiled June 2010, designed by Sheila Betts.
Trumpington Local History Group
History of Trumpington Village
Hall: 1960s: Problems, Changes
Copyright © Trumpington Local History Group, 2009. Updated 9 June 2009
This is the eighth part of the history of Trumpington Village Hall. For an
introduction to the series, see
History of Trumpington Village Hall.
Continue with the next part of the history of Trumpington Village Hall.
Display panel about the history
of the Village Hall, Centenary
Exhibition, October 2008.
Photo: Stephen Brown.
Display panel about the history of the Village Hall, Centenary Exhibition, October 2008.
In 1962, the Trustees (chaired by F.W.W. Pemberton, later Sir Francis) formed a Management
Committee to control the affairs of the Hall, with E.N. Clark as Chairman and J.R. Harper as
Secretary/Treasurer. In May 1962, the Committee circulated a letter to residents with
information about the changes. They explained that the main hall was available for hire, but the
rear hall was devoted to a Social Club which was administered by the British Legion and was
open to membership by any adult male of Trumpington. The Committee identified a number of
problems, including the need for roof repairs, new flooring in the main hall, redecoration and
improved heating, lighting, kitchen facilities and toilets. They recognised that this work would
require major expenditure and that no appeal for funds had been made for 40 years, during
which time only the generous help of a few local residents had enabled the Hall to continue to
provide a social centre at low cost to users.

The problems were not resolved in the subsequent years. At the Committee meeting held on 20
October 1967, the Secretary read a letter received from the Secretary of the Men's Social Club,
complaining that the Club was now without heat, as both stoves were beyond repair, that the
toilet cistern was faulty, and some of the electrical switches were dangerous. The members of
the Club also wished to know the views of the Committee on the admission of ladies to the
Club. The Committee felt that two gas fires would be preferable to replace the old coke fires,
and authorised the installation up to a cost of £70, the gas supply to be metered with a 2/- slot
meter. With regard to the admission of ladies to the Club, there would arise difficulty as to
toilets, but the Committee saw no objection to visits by occasional lady guests!

The fuller resolution of the problems took another 10 years.
Memo about the Management Committee, prior to it being established, early 1962.
Memo about the
Management Committee,
prior to it being established,
early 1962. Source: Village
Hall archive.
Letter from the Committee to local residents, May 1962.
Letter from the Committee
to local residents, May
1962. Source: Village Hall
archive.
Friendship Club Christmas
Party, 1965. The
membership in 1965 stood
at 79, but there were often
visitors swelling the
numbers. Photo: Bert
Truelove.
For 60 years since the building of the hall in 1908, the northern boundary had been the track to
Manor Farm, with the farm itself across the track. In 1968-69, Manor Farm was demolished
and replaced with houses and a new road (Beverley Way) that threatened to encroach on the
front of the Hall. After concern about the effect of the road on the hall, it was agreed that the
line of the road would be amended to have less impact.
Manor Farm in the 1930s.
Manor Farm in the 1930s. Photo:
Rachel Tarry. Reproduced in
Trumpington Past & Present, p.
33.
Janet Brown and her cousins sitting on
the wall around Manor Farm, with the
Village Hall behind, mid-1960s. Photo:
Kathy Eastman. Reproduced in
Trumpington Past & Present, p. 34.
Letter about the re-alignment of the footpath which protects the frontage of the Hall.
Plan of the re-alignment of the footpath which protects the frontage of the Hall.
Letter from F.W.W.
Pemberton with revised
plan showing re-alignment
of the footpath which
protects the frontage of the
Hall. Source: Village Hall
archive.
Manor Farm and its surroundings, before demolition.
Manor Farm and its surroundings, before demolition.
The house to the
north of Manor
Farm, before
demolition, with the
new houses in
Beverley Way in the
background, c.
1973. Photo: Peter
Dawson.
Construction work on the transformation
of Manor Farm into Beverley Way, with
the Village Hall and Scout huts to the left,
1968. Photo: Peter Dawson.
Construction work on the transformation of Manor Farm into Beverley Way, with the Village Hall and Scout huts to the left, 1968.
Friendship Club Christmas Party, 1965.
Janet Brown and her cousins sitting on the wall around Manor Farm, with the Village Hall behind, mid-1960s.
The house to the
north of Manor
Farm, before
demolition, with
the Red Lion in
the background,
c. 1973. Photo:
Peter Dawson.