Trumpington Village Sign unveiled June 2010, designed by Sheila Betts.
Trumpington Local History Group
The Original Trumpington Village
Sign
Copyright © Trumpington Local History Group, 2014. Updated 9 July 2014.
Email:
admin@trumpingtonlocalhistorygroup.org
This page is about the original village
sign which was made in 1987 and
renovated in 1998.

There are also pages about the
new
sign and its unveiling and an
introduction to the signs.
Peter Dawson holding a photograph of the original Village Sign
alongside the new sign, 15 June 2010. Photo: Martin Jones.
The original sign was the inspiration of Councillor Betty Suckling, who organised the
fund-raising for the project. The sign was designed by Philip Jordan and made by Stephen
Harris, both local residents. The design incorporated a knight on horseback, the village name
and a shield. It was constructed from wood, marine plywood and paint.

The sign was unveiled by Stan Newell on a very wet day in 1987.
Unveiling of the original village sign by Stan Newell, 1987. Photo: Cambridge Evening News, reproduced in Trumpington Past & Present, p. 133.
Unveiling the original village sign, 1987. Photo: Cambridge Evening
News, reproduced in
Trumpington Past & Present, p. 133.
The original village sign, after renovation in 1998. Photo: Peter Dawson, March 1998.
The original village sign, after
renovation in 1998. Photo: Peter
Dawson, March 1998.
By late 1997, the sign was in need of renovation and Peter Dawson took on the project at the
invitation of the Trumpington Women's Institute, with advice from Stephen Harris and support
from Trumpington Farm Company. The sign was moved to the farm workshop, where Peter
realised that some of the wood had started to rot and much of the paint had flaked and peeled.
Peter had to strip most of the upper pictorial section and the lettering in the middle section to
bare wood. The restoration turned out to be a much more extensive and time-consuming
project than original envisaged, but the result was well worthwhile, as it gave the sign a further
12 years of life. The renovated sign was reinstalled on 24 February 1998.
Renovation of the original village sign. Photo: Peter Dawson, 1998.
Renovation of the original village sign. Photo: Peter Dawson, 1998.
Renovation of the original village sign. Photo: Peter Dawson, 1998.
Renovation work on the original village sign.
Photos: Peter Dawson, 1998.
Peter Dawson standing alongside the renovated original sign. Photo: Peter Dawson, 1998.
Peter Dawson standing
alongside the renovated original
sign. Photo: Peter Dawson,
1998.
The knight on horseback after renovation of the original village sign. Photo: Peter Dawson, 1998.
Reinstalling the original village sign, February 1998. Photo: Peter Dawson, 1998.
Reinstalling the original village sign, February 1998. Photo: Peter Dawson, 1998.
Reinstalling the
original village sign,
February 1998.
Photo: Peter
Dawson, 1998.
Peter Dawson and Stephen Harris beside the renovated original sign, February 1998. Photo: Peter Dawson, 1998.
Peter Dawson and Stephen
Harris beside the renovated
original sign, February 1998.
Photo: Peter Dawson, 1998.
Peter Dawson holding a photograph of the original Village Sign alongside the new sign, 15 June 2010. Photo: Martin Jones.
Peter Dawson writes: "Before restoration
began in late 1997, a photograph of the top
section was taken as a guide to ensure true
replication of the original design and colours.
Sanding, washing and undercoating almost
obliterated this section, necessitating a degree
of guesswork when re-creating the finer details.

The marine plywood letters
'TRUMPINGTON' were prepared and
painted in situ, to avoid damage.

The knight's small shield and the trumpets and
crosses on the large shield were carefully
removed for separate renovation in the
warmth of my conservatory. Antony
Pemberton arranged for the sign itself to be
moved from the rather dark workshop to an
unheated garage with better light near
Trumpington Hall.

The small shield was returned to the knight
and nailed and glued in place together with its
hidden set of coins, originally placed there by
Stephen Harris.

Throughout the process, cracks and gaps were
carefully filled and up to three coats of enamel
paints applied to help seal joints and provide a
weather-proof finish. It was decided not to
overcoat the sign with clear varnish as had
been done originally, because this had lifted
some areas of paint.

The back of the sign was coated in black
Hammerite paint. The retaining brackets and
bolts were de-rusted and similarly painted.

About 120 hours spread over 2½ months were
spent on the renovation. The cost of just over
£100 was funded by the Trumpington
Women's Institute and the Trumpington
Charities."
Unveiling the original village sign, 1987. Photos: Peter Dawson.